The Dharma Wheel or Dharmachakra wheel - Buddha Statue Meanings About Buddha
Quotes & Sayings  | Portrait Images | Landscape Images> | Privacy Policy | ActionAid Haiti Earthquake+ Appeal  
Home
Contact Us
Links
Sitemap
Glossary of Buddhist terms
About Us

Buddha Hands
Buddha Laying
Buddha Sitting
Buddha Standing
Buddha Walking
Buddha Mudras

Thailand Buddha Statues

The Sukhothai period brought forth an interpretation of the Thai Buddha that is elegant, with sinuous bodies and slender, oval faces.

This style emphasised the spiritual aspect of the Buddha by omitting anatomical details. The effect was enhanced by the common practice of casting images in metal rather than carving them.

This period saw the introduction of the "walking Buddha" pose. Sukhothai artists tried to follow the defining marks of a Buddha set out in ancient Pali texts:

- skin so smooth that dust cannot stick

- legs like a deer

- thighs like a banyan tree

- shoulders massive as an elephant's head,

- arms round like an elephant's trunk, and long enough to touch the knees

- hands like lotuses about to bloom - fingertips turned back like petals

- head like an egg - hair like scorpion stingers - chin like a mango stone

- nose like a parrot's beak - earlobes lengthened by the earrings of royalty

- eyelashes like a cow's - eyebrows like drawn bows



Typical 'Thai Style' Buddha

Advertise on Buddha Statue Meanings

The Buddhist Flag
First hoisted in 1885 in Sri Lanka, is a symbol of faith and peace used throughout the world to represent the Buddhist faith.

Buddhist Flag Picture - Buddhist Flag Colours - The Buddhist Flag Sri Lanka 1885

Buddhist Flag Meanings
Blue: Universal Compassion
Yellow: The Middle Path
Red: Blessings
White: Purity and Liberation
Orange: Wisdom


 
Ayutthaya style Buddha image

The Dharma Wheel

Spokes of the Dharmachakra - "The Dharma Wheel" Meaning - The Dharma Wheel Symbol - The Dharma Wheel Image - 8 spokes representing the Noble Eightfold Path (Ariya magga)

In Buddhism—according to the Pali Canon, Vinayapitaka, Khandhaka, Mahavagga, the number of spokes of the Dharmachakra represent various meanings:

8 spokes representing the Noble Eightfold Path (Ariya magga).
12 spokes representing the Twelve Laws of Dependent Origination (Paticcasamuppada).
24 spokes representing the Twelve Laws of Dependent Origination and the Twelve Laws of Dependent Termination (Paticcasamuppada).
31 spokes representing 31 realms of existence (11 realms of desire, 16 realms of form and 4 realms of formlessness).


Nam-Myoho-Renge-Kyo is a Japanese Buddhist chant based upon the Lotus Sutra. Nichiren Daishonin (Feb 16, 1222 – Oct 13, 1282) a Buddhist monk who lived during the Kamakura period (1185–1333) in Japan. Nichiren taught devotion to the Lotus Sutra, entitled Myōhō-Renge-Kyō in Japanese, as the exclusive means to attain enlightenment and the chanting of Nam-Myōhō-Renge-Kyō as the essential practice of the teaching. Various schools with diverging interpretations of Nichiren's teachings comprise Nichiren Buddhism.
Nam - To devote one's life
Myoho - Myo is the mystic nature of life and Ho, its manifestation
Renge - "Lotus Flower"; which symolises the ballance of cause and effect
Kyo - Sutra, the voice or teachings of Buddha (The sound or vibration that connects everything in the ubiverse)


As the Buddha had never claimed to be a god, it is evident that he never prescribed the form of worship that was to be rendered to him. A legend, however, attributes to him the institution of this form of worship

Thailand Travel Guide

Free Thailand Travel Guide


Owned & Managed By: JeGraNet  © Copyright 2010 - 2012. All rights reserved